Author Topic: BoX Engine Data  (Read 184 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline _AH_DarkWolf

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 6634
BoX Engine Data
« on: October 25, 2019, 06:29:42 AM »
The engines in BoX have thresholds for the various modes like continuous/unlimited, combat and war emergency power. It can be kind of pain to find the proper gauge in each aircraft with all the different languages and different measurements like lbs boost, ata, inches hg etc. An easy way to manage this is to use the % numbers that appear at the right side of the screen when you adjust things like rpm setting and throttle.

So this thread is meant as a repository of this info to act as kind of a cheat sheet, allowing you to set your stuff with less chance of blowing up. I've included mixture info where applicable for when you start parked since you now have to set that manually. RPM is adjusted with the Propeller RPM Control setting, the other with your throttle. Generally the standard for takeoff seems to be combat power.

This thread will be a work in progress as things change, we learn more and info is submitted for other aircraft. I've noticed the messages indicating what mode you are in sometimes does not match the specific numbers stated in the pilots notes but these settings should get you close.

DW


P-51D-15

Mixture - 70% for Auto Rich

       Cruise      -      2400 rpm / 69%      -      36 inches Hg / 60% (55%)

Continuous      -      2700 rpm / 83%      -      46 inches Hg / 69% (66%) 

     Combat      -      3000 rpm / 100%    -      61 inches Hg / 94% (78%)

          WEP      -      3000 rpm / 100%    -      67 (75) inches Hg / 100% (100%)


Notes : Bold settings in brackets are for use with 150 octane fuel option. The "Cruise" setting is not actually listed in the pilot notes, but is on the data plate on the right side of the cockpit in game.


P-38J-25

Mixture - 70% for Auto Rich

Continuous      -      2600 rpm / 78%      -      44 inches Hg / 72% 

     Combat      -      3000 rpm / 98%      -      54 inches Hg / 89%

          WEP      -      3000 rpm / 98%    -      60 inches Hg / 100%


Notes : When spooling up for takeoff you must hold the brakes and wait a few seconds for the power to come up to 54 inches Hg. It will stop at about 51 inches for a few seconds until the turbochargers come up and push it up to 54 inches.


P-47D-28

Mixture - 85% for Auto Rich

Continuous      -      2550 rpm / 87%      -      42 inches Hg / 83% 

     Combat      -      2700 rpm / 100%    -      52 inches Hg / 100%

          WEP      -      2700 rpm / 100%    -      64 inches Hg / 100% + Water Injection


Notes : Before takeoff you can interconnect the throttle and turbocharger levers and pretty much leave em like that. I think it only becomes an issue at about 26,000 feet when you gotta start pulling the turbocharger back to keep it in the right RPM range. The P-47 has a number of radiator\shutters\flaps that can be adjusted. So far I generally set the oil cooler and inlet cowl shutters to neutral (50%) and the outlet cowl shutters to 25%. Not sure about those settings for combat though.


Spitfire Mk.IXe

Merlin 66 Engine (Never used the Merlin 70 myself yet as its for high altitude)

Continuous      -      2650 rpm / 65%      -      +7 lbs boost / 65%  (56%)

     Combat      -      2850 rpm / 85%      -      +12 lbs boost / 85% (69%)

          WEP      -      3000 rpm / 100%    -      +18 (+25) lbs boost / 100% (100%)


Notes : Bold settings in brackets are for use with 150 octane fuel option.


Tempest Mk.V ser.2

Mixture - 100% for engine start, 50% for normal operation.

Continuous      -      3150 rpm / 71%      -      +4.5 lbs boost / 80%

     Combat      -      3700 rpm / 98%      -      +7 lbs boost / 90%

          WEP      -      3700 rpm / 98%    -      +9 (+11) lbs boost / 100%


Notes : Bold settings in brackets represents using the +11 lbs boost mod, doesn't change the required engine RPM or throttle settings.


Ju 87 D-3

Continuous      -      2250 rpm / 75%      -      1.15 ata / 76%

        Climb      -      2400 rpm / 85%      -      1.25 ata / 85%

     Takeoff      -      2600 rpm / 100%    -      1.42 ata / 100%


"In War: Resolution, In Defeat: Defiance, In Victory: Magnanimity, In Peace: Good Will" - Winston S. Churchill

Offline _AH_Col._Hogan

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 3550
  • S.A.P.P.
Re: BoX Engine Data
« Reply #1 on: October 25, 2019, 04:08:06 PM »
Thanks for the data.

Get that Stuka outa here!!!

S!

Offline _AH_Hollywood

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1499
  • It never happened!
Re: BoX Engine Data
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2019, 09:54:44 PM »

Nice work DW.... it's also worth mentioning, the engine timers on the Emergency and WEP power settings..

IL-2 1946 will let you fly around all day at Max Power.. not so much in BOS GBs

Some are more fragile than others.. P-40 and P-39 seem to have the big glass chins..
P-51 can run 15 mins at Emergency and 5 mins at WEP..
"You sneaky little bastards aren't getting doodly sh*t from me, except maybe my name, rank, and Social Security number: Wood, Hollis P., Lumberjack, Social Security 106-43-2185."-Slim Pickens-The movie-1941

Offline _AH_DarkWolf

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 6634
Re: BoX Engine Data
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2019, 12:16:07 AM »
Yeah, I need to add some supercharger data too. The Tempest has a manual one for example. WIP.

The engine timer thing may need more discussion, or perhaps its own discussion to some degree. Not sure I understand it. I was reading a thread on the official forums that seemed to suggest that combat power and WEP were not mutually exclusive. Like you can't run a full 15 minutes at combat then use 5 mins of WEP. One eats into the available time of the other, WEP more so. At least I think thats the gist of what I was reading?

DW


"In War: Resolution, In Defeat: Defiance, In Victory: Magnanimity, In Peace: Good Will" - Winston S. Churchill

Offline _AH_Hollywood

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 1499
  • It never happened!
Re: BoX Engine Data
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2019, 02:09:59 AM »

Timer and engine management is a strange bird.. Axis planes "recoop faster"  then Allied and each plane has it own querks. I have heard that Allied planes take 3x as long..
I tend to fly max continuous and rarely push above Emergency..

I'd be happy to test the P-51.. I have seen some people's threads... where they run higher MP with lower RPM and can extend the timers.

« Last Edit: November 03, 2019, 03:23:39 PM by _AH_Hollywood »
"You sneaky little bastards aren't getting doodly sh*t from me, except maybe my name, rank, and Social Security number: Wood, Hollis P., Lumberjack, Social Security 106-43-2185."-Slim Pickens-The movie-1941

Offline _AH_DarkWolf

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 6634
Re: BoX Engine Data
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2019, 11:01:18 PM »
Hmm, I was hoping there might have been a more general rule of thumb for calculating the combat vs WEP thing.

I noticed some guys talking about achieving higher top speeds with merlin engined aircraft using 2700 rpm once you have built up some speed. So I guess these settings are not optimum for every situation.

I guess we'll add more as we learn more.

DW


"In War: Resolution, In Defeat: Defiance, In Victory: Magnanimity, In Peace: Good Will" - Winston S. Churchill

Offline _AH_Olds

  • Aces High Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1837
  • GM! Bring Back Olds!
Re: BoX Engine Data
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2019, 01:34:27 PM »
I can understand the engine timers from an engineering and mechanic's perspective. An engine is designed to run at a certain rated speed, with a limit above that (hence the redline on your tach in your car or truck). You can exceed that for a while, but at some point you are going to exceed the design limits, and then bad things happen, like connecting rods snapping or the engine seizing. Every engine is designed differently, with different mechanical limits. You can only stress connecting rods, bolts, etc. for so long until they break. Some engines, like the Allison in the 38 and the P-40, had a nasty habit of grenading even without exceeding their limits. The Allison would just blow in mid-flight (which would be a real problem in the P-40). The 38 pilots, however, learned how to handle this when it happened. They would pull the throttles back on both engines, feather the bad engine, and then slowly bring the good engine back up to speed. Most of the time they could continue the mission, or at least make it back home. I seem to remember reading that some pilots were still able to fight using only one engine, and still make it home!
"My choice early in life was either to be a piano-player in a whorehouse or a politician. And to tell the truth, there's hardly any difference". - Harry S. Truman